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North Carolina. During December 1994, a 2-day-old boy born 8 weeks prematurely developed respiratory difficulties, had pneumothorax diagnosed, and was transferred to a referral hospital. Blood obtained at birth for culture had been negative, but a culture of blood obtained 9 days later because of an elevated white blood cell count yielded Salmonella serotype Kintambo. He was treated with intravenous ampicillin for Salmonella sepsis and was discharged from the hospital after 30 days. Eleven days after the positive culture was collected, Salmonella Kintambo was cultured from a blood sample obtained from a 12-day-old acutely ill boy who was born at 28 weeks' gestation and had shared a room at the referral hospital with the first infant. The second infant was treated with intravenous cefotaxime for Salmonella sepsis and was discharged after 44 days. Both infants had been in the hospital continuously from birth until onset of illness. The mother of the first infant reported having had a diarrheal illness 4 days before the birth of the infant; she frequently handled a savanna monitor lizard (Varanus exanthemapicus) that the family had purchased in September 1994 and kept in a cage in the kitchen. Culture of a stool sample from the lizard yielded Salmonella Kintambo. The second family did not own a reptile.

Ohio. During January 1994, a 6-week-old boy was hospitalized because of diarrhea, stiff neck, and fever; culture of samples of blood and cerebrospinal fluid yielded Salmonella serotype Stanley. The infant was treated with intravenous cefotaxime for Salmonella sepsis and meningitis and discharged from the hospital after 56 days. He had been fed only formula and had not attended a child-care facility; household contacts were asymptomatic. The family had purchased a 4-inch water turtle in April 1993. A culture of stool from the turtle yielded Salmonella Stanley. Although the infant had not had contact with the turtle, other family members had had direct contact, and the turtle's food and water bowls were washed in the kitchen sink.

Pennsylvania. During October 1994, a 21-day-old girl was hospitalized because of an illness including vomiting, bloody diarrhea, and fever. She received empirical treatment with intravenous ampicillin. A culture of stool yielded Salmonella serotype Poona; she was discharged from the hospital after 11 days. Other members of the family were asymptomatic. The infant had been fed infant formula and had not attended a child-care center. The family owned an iguana, and culture of a stool sample from the iguana yielded Salmonella Poona. Although the infant did not have contact with the iguana, the iguana was handled frequently by her mother and other members of the family.